Scenes from the Recon and Surveillance Course

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Hasty hide site is prepared to conceal rucksack and provide an overnight position. Note the abundance of dead grass in the area- makes for a simple early warning to the Scout should anyone (or anything) approach their position.
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Larger hide site prepared for a three man team. Note the triangular shape. 
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Hide site, rear. 
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Pack light, freeze at night? Usually, but not always. Even with a morning frost, I slept comfortable enough with a GI bivy cover, Snugpak Jungle Blanket, and GI casualty blanket. A big part of the course of learning what your actually need, and what you can exist without. 
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Three man Recce team prepares a plan at the Objective Rally Point.
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Same Recce Team, preparing to move. 
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The objective: A Small Town of Shoothouses and a mission to surveil the medical facility. 
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Student in a cobra hood completes his range card and prepares to move back to the Objective Rally Point to prepare a SALUTE Report with the other team mates. 
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Integration of technology: using drones as force multipliers. 

Interested in training? Check the Training Calendar. There is another open enrollment Recon Course coming up in October. 

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5 thoughts on “Scenes from the Recon and Surveillance Course

  1. NC Scout. Was that a Snugpak Jungle Blanket or the Snugpak Jungle Bag in your picture? Also, if you would compare it to a Military Modular Sleeping system – Lightweight sleeping bag in a Bivy cover for warmth, compressed size, and weight, I sure would appreciate it. I assume that since you carry it rather than the Military Modular system you have good reasons. Thanks

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Its the Jungle Blanket. If it compares to anything, it would be the green or lightweight bag from the MSS, even though that’s not really fair. Its more in between a woobie (which its far superior) and the lightweight bag.

      The bottom line is that on a patrol you’re not doing a lot of sleeping, especially not comfortably. But that setup I pictured will keep you far from hypothermia. It’s not the best sleep you’ve ever had, but it’ll keep you alive.

      Like

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